Busy is the new fine – why I am fighting back

How many of your casual conversations start something like this:

“How are you?”

“Oh, you know, busy!”

It seems busy is the new fine.

Default answer, default setting
What’s the big deal? It’s just a throw away response to a polite question, which probably doesn’t interest the asker that much anyway.

But it is a big deal – it’s accepting and reinforcing a social norm.

Busyness is no longer a blip, a short burst of extra activity, an exception– it’s the default. Being busy is not just socially acceptable, it’s almost expected.

Busy is not fine
By operating with busyness as the default setting we are doing ourselves a disservice. We are sending out messages like:

  • if you’re not busy, you’re not successful or important
  • it’s not enough to be satisfied with what you have, you should always want to do more and have more
  • quantity is more valuable than quality.

Worse still busyness blinds us. When we’re busy, we’re more concerned with the what than the why. When we’re busy, there’s no room to think, reflect or question. In a world where we’re busy by default, in effect, we put our heads in the sand.

Continue reading “Busy is the new fine – why I am fighting back”

But, why?

If, like me, you live with a three year old, then you probably ponder a seemingly endless array of “But, why?” questions everyday!

Right now, I am participating in WordPress’s Blogging 101 course . The course poses a great question, “Why do you blog and not just keep a diary?”.

Obviously, I write a blog because I want other people to read what I write. But, why?

Connection
One reason that I write for the world to read is because I want to connect with people with similar interests. Yay for other people who struggle with the indecision around hoarding vs chucking out plastic take out containers and like to share ideas about using up breadcrumbs! I’m pretty stunned that people actually read what I write. And commenters – oh my goodness, you truly make my day and give me so much motivation to continue.

Motivation
Another reason that I blog rather than keep a diary is for external accountability. I’ve only made it through the introduction of Gretchin Rubin’s Better Than Before , but I’ve already discovered that I’m clearly an “obliger” . Bascially, this means if I don’t feel like I’m letting someone down by not doing it, then chances are I won’t do it! Lame, but true. Publishing here creates an expectation amongst my audience that I will keep publishing, and that’s the kind of motivation that I need to keep writing.

Readers, commenters and followers you are the reason that I blog. I really appreciate that you give your precious time to my humble opinion. I am very grateful – thank you.

Do you blog? Why? What motivates you?